Why I’m a Control Freak

I’m on vacation this week in Hilton Head, SC. It takes the solitude of a place like Hilton Head to open me up to write this blog post. I’ve been thinking about it for several months, but I just haven’t been able to muster the peace or courage or insanity or whatever it is that I’ve needed to write. Until now.

When I started first grade, I cried every day when my dad dropped me off at school. I don’t mean the tearful goodbye of a little kid who’s going to miss her parents for a few hours. I mean the screaming, holding onto his leg type of crying of a little kid who’s desperately afraid she wouldn’t see him again.

By that point, I already knew I was adopted and that knowledge messed with my world. Before you lash out about telling children too young, I want you to know I forced my parents into the conversation with questions they couldn’t answer without being open about my adoption, and they did a great job of explaining the whole thing. Adoption was and is part of my reality, and my parents felt it was important to acknowledge that fact and I am thankful they did.

It’s difficult for a little kid going to school for the first time not to have irrational fears. But mine were different; they weren’t completely irrational because they were built in some reality. For all the right reasons, my natural parents chose not to raise me. I was told that fact from the first time my parents told me about my adoption.

But when you’re a kid, that means other people can decide not to raise you too, and when I went to school each morning, I was afraid that’s the decision my parents would make while I was at school. I envisioned them just deciding not to pick me up. So I would be “that kid” who sits on the school bench, waiting for someone who is late to get them, but my situation would be different because my someone just wouldn’t be coming at all.

My parents always came, but I still believed it would be possible for them to decide not to and in my head that could happen at any time. All that seems silly now, as an adult, after I’ve heard my natural parents talk about their respective decisions, and witnessed the agony of the decision for my natural mom, who still can’t talk about the whole process without getting emotional.

But who I am at 38 is shaped by who I was at 5, and I like to be in control because it ensures that I will never be “that kid” – physically or emotionally. I protect that part of me with every fiber of my being. I see that 5 year old every time I think about whether I can trust someone. I see that 5 year old every time I consider whether I should reveal my heart to friends and even family. I see that 5 year old every time I think about letting someone else have any semblance of control in my life. I see that 5 year old and I think it’s my responsibility to protect her.

I’ve lived 38 good years on this earth. I have a few close friends, and they are the best I could ever ask for in my life. I have married a wonderful guy, who I love deeply and who loves me despite my weaknesses. I have families (adopted and natural) that I love with all of my heart and who love me.

But I hold part of myself back – even from my friends, and my husband, and my families. And I think they know it. And I think they respect it. And I think they hope one day I won’t. And I think they will love me even if I do. And I think it’s something I want to change. And I think it’s something I may never be able to change. But I’m trying. And I think that’s worth something.

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4 comments on “Why I’m a Control Freak

  1. Ann Hajewski says:

    Thank you for writing this. It must have been difficult to start, but I could see it being hard to stop once you do. I am adopted. You could be writing transcripts from my own head. It hurts. It is what it is. We live with it. We have to. Maybe next time around we’ll just get to be kids…regular kids. I hope so, or I’m taking my ball and my bat and I’m going home. Wherever that may be.

  2. Ann Hajewski says:

    Hi Becky,
    I stand with my big old flat feet planted firmly on nothing in particular, gossemer and unencumbered go I, tribe of one. Surrounded by the family that I have adopted or that have adopted me. I can’t keep focusing on what I can’t have and am not sure I would even want now, unless I’m jimmy Buffetts’ long lost love child. I could work with that, goodness knows ‘ half baked fruitcake’ is a fitting description on occasion. Otherwise its me and Popeye. I yam what I yam and that’s all what I yam. I’m a water based biped with bony incursions, mostly in my head. I consume, void and repeat. What else do I need to know?

  3. Misty says:

    Wow. I feel like I could have written this. It is so close to my own reality. Thank you. I do not feel so alone

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